Featured

Watch: The First Trailer for Hal Hartley’s Ned Rifle

Ned Rifle Ned Rifle

Here’s the first trailer for Ned Rifle, the third part of Hal Hartley’s “Henry Fool” trilogy, which began with the titular 1998 film and continued with 2007′s Fay Grim. The trailer’s wordless for a good chunk, but when we finally hear words, we know exactly what’s going on: Henry (Thomas Jay Ryan) and Fay (Parker Posey)’s son Ned (Liam Aiken) is going to find his dad and kill him. This capstone film — “probably” the final installment, the Kickstarter hedged its bets — was posted in advance of the film’s premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival later this year. Those who want more trailers while they wait should probably be following Hartley’s YouTube channel.

By

“Who the Hell is From Maine?”: Director Lance Edmands on Bluebird and Regional Specificity

Bluebird Bluebird

I still have a Maine driver’s license, even though I’ve lived in Brooklyn for more than a decade now. When it comes up for renewal every few years, I travel back to the DMV in the town where I grew up and dutifully pose for a new photograph. People think this is crazy (and illegal) and I suppose they’re right, but it means a lot to me to be identified as a Mainer. When I get carded at a bar, the bouncer will take one look at my ID and inevitably say something like, “Maine? Who the hell is from Maine?” Well, I’m from Maine and I’m proud of it — although that wasn’t always the case. When I was…  Read more

By

35mm Colors in Digital Translation in Boyhood

Boyhood Boyhood

One aspect of Boyhood that’s been relatively underdiscussed (assuming there are any such left) is its use of 35mm, which has been widely noted but little parsed. Richard Linklater’s repeatedly noted that the primary reason for shooting on film over 12 years was to ensure visual continuity from one year to the next. This doesn’t mean he’s a Luddite in any way, as he explains in comments from a recent screening at the BFI on technology’s pros and cons: There is nothing more stable than a 35mm negative. Had I started on the best HD camera back in 2002, I’d have been on my fifth by now. It was never even much of a decision. But I didn’t like the…  Read more

By

Interview Avoidance and Bollywood Rip-offs: Park Chan-wook on Vengeance, End Titles and Medium Cool

Stoker Stoker

“Mr. Park Chan-wook is not giving any interviews. Sorry.” The Korean auteur was one of the biggest names present at the recently concluded 31st Jerusalem Film Festival, second only perhaps to Spike Jonze (who doesn’t really make for charming interviews). The problem with big names at festivals, though, is that securing a short meeting with them — let alone an interview — is difficult. The curt message from the festival press department, quoted above, is an example of that. Nevertheless, armed with the kind of resilience and never-say-die attitude that arises naturally out of journalistic passion and an empty bank account, I trekked over to a panel discussion Park Chan-wook was part of. At the end, I walked over to…  Read more

By

Czech Dream: The 49th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival

Waiting For August Waiting For August

Though the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival bills itself as “the most important film event in Central and Eastern Europe,” such a bold declaration belies the fact that KVIFF is anything but snobby and self-serious. Back in 2011 I covered the prestigious fest, located in a fairytale scenic, spa city – once frequented by Beethoven and Goethe – about an hour-and-a-half from Prague by car. (That would be a BMW, the “official car” of KVIFF, the company having its own “BMW Zone” where you can check out the latest models nearby the ultra-chic Grandhotel Pupp.) Returning three years later I still find myself surprised by how young this nearly 50-year-old festival feels. Taking advantage of the Czech Republic’s location as…  Read more

By

Sympathy, Said the Shark: Shooting in POV

SStSFeatured

Writer, director and editor Devin Lawrence says that when he set out to make Sympathy, Said the Shark he’d already gone through two projects which had stalled out due to lack of financing, so he decided he had to come up with something where “money can no longer be the ultimate road block.” The resulting project was shot in 14 days and primarily in one location, but it was by no means a simple project to make as much of it was shot using a POV rig built around the Blackmagic Pocket Camera. Lawrence, who works in LA primarily as a writer and editor, first met executive producer Zak Bagans while working on Ghost Adventures for the Travel Channel, which Bagans…  Read more

By

T(ERROR) Co-Directors Lyric R. Cabral and David Felix Sutcliffe at the Sundance Labs

Laura Minnear (editor), David Felix Sutcliffe (co-director), Lyric R. Cabral (co-director) (Photo by Ryan Johnson) Laura Minnear (editor), David Felix Sutcliffe (co-director), Lyric R. Cabral (co-director) (Photo by Ryan Johnson)

[Below, co-directors Lyric R. Cabral and David Felix Sutcliffe share their experiences at the Sundance Documentary Edit and Story Labs. For more background on the team, read our 25 New Faces profile from last year.] Lyric:   I have closely known the main character of our film for 12 years, and have witnessed, firsthand, many of the salient moments of his lengthy career as an FBI counterterrorism informant. We met while he was active in two separate international and domestic sting operations, and our trusting relationship has always been complicated by both government surveillance and the turbulence of his past. Because of his desire to reveal his story for a wide audience, I have wrestled with the balance of bluntly articulating my…  Read more

By

What’s in the Summer Issue of Filmmaker?

Boyhood Boyhood

What’s in the summer issue of Filmmaker? Well, first of all, our 2014 25 New Faces, but you already knew that. (If you didn’t, click here and find out who they are.) But there’s a lot more to be found in our print edition. On the cover is Rick Linklater’s chrono-masterpiece, Boyhood. My interview is 5,000 words or so, and maybe the best things about it are just the rhythms of Linklater’s voice and the little bits of filmmaking — and life — wisdom he departs along the way. Our Managing Editor, Vadim Rizov, has been obsessively checking out all the other Linklater profiles and he assures me there is stuff here you won’t find elsewhere. Speaking of Rizov, he…  Read more

By

Festivals & Events

The Humbling The Humbling

First Batch of 2014 TIFF Titles Announced

In a press conference this morning, Cameron Bailey and Co. released the Special Presentation and Gala selections for the upcoming edition of the Toronto International Film Festival. Lots to parse through as the slate boasts world premieres from Christian Petzold, Mia Hansen-Løve, Noah Baumbach, David Gordon Green,…  Read more

By
on Jul 22, 2014

VOD Picks

  • life-itself-poster1
    Life Itself Documentary
    Magnolia Pictures
    Official site
    7/4/14 iTunes MOD
  • ping-pong-summer-134400-poster-xlarge-resized
    Ping Pong Summer Comedy
    Gravitas Ventures
    Official site
    6/6/2014 MOD VOD

Interviews

Stoker Stoker

Interview Avoidance and Bollywood Rip-offs: Park Chan-wook on Vengeance, End Titles and Medium Cool

“Mr. Park Chan-wook is not giving any interviews. Sorry.” The Korean auteur was one of the biggest names present at the recently concluded 31st Jerusalem Film Festival, second only perhaps to Spike Jonze (who doesn’t really make for charming interviews). The problem with big names…  Read more

By
on Jul 22, 2014

@FilmmakerMag