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At Cannes 2017, The Square Wins Palme d’Or; Coppola Best Director; and Lynn Ramsay’s Latest Wins Two

The Square

Here, as they are announced, are the winners of the 2017 Cannes Film Festival. Palme d’Or: The Square, Ruben Ostlund. Special Prize for the 70th Anniversary: Nicole Kidman Grand Prix: 120 Beats Per Minute, directed by Robin Campillo Jury Prize: Loveless, Andrey Zvyagintsev Best Actress: Diane Kruger, In the Fade Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix, You Were Never Really Here Best Director: Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled Best Screenplay: The Killing of a Sacred Deer (Yorgos Lathimos and Efthymis Filippou) and Lynn Ramsay (You Were Never Really Here) The Camera d’Or (given to best first film): Jeunne Femme/Montparnasse Bienvenue, directed by Leonor Serraille Best Short Film: A Gentle Night (Qui Yang) Short Film Special Mention: Katto (Teppo Airaksinen)

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Twin Peaks and Film as Ritual: Sam Kuhn’s Cannes Diary, the Coda

Director, screenwriter and boatbuilder (!) Sam Kuhn is in Cannes premiering his short film, Möbius — described as “a moth-eaten tale of magic and mutation half remembered by a teen poet who’s beloved lies lifeless in a stream” — in Critic’s Week. Filmmaker asked Kuhn, who hails from the Pacific Northwest, to keep a diary of his experiences, which rapidly went from jet-lagged to deeply strange. Here is his final entry; click here for them all. CODA Full night sleep. First in what feels like forever. Hit the 4:00 PM day-after-screening of Twin Peaks in a Toronto Raptors jacket gifted by Producer L. Most notable was the claim Showtime indeed delivered upon: 25 years later. The actors were old, the…  Read more

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Crying Seagull Tears Above the Croisette: Sam Kuhn’s Cannes Diary, Part Six

Actress Caley Jones

Director, screenwriter and boatbuilder (!) Sam Kuhn is in Cannes premiering his short film, Möbius — described as “a moth-eaten tale of magic and mutation half remembered by a teen poet who’s beloved lies lifeless in a stream” — in Critic’s Week. Filmmaker asked Kuhn, who hails from the Pacific Northwest, to keep a diary of his experiences, which rapidly went from jet-lagged to deeply strange. Here is his sixth entry; click here for them all. Day 8 Eight and it’s full circle, which seems fitting as “8” is a basic Möbius-like shape. Woke and walked immediately to the “morning after” bruch which I should’ve known no one would attend. Afterwards a photoshoot between two large house plants with the…  Read more

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Cannes Dispatch #3: Jeannette, the Childhood of Joan of Arc; The Florida Project; Good Time

Jeanne Voisin in Jeannette, the Childhood of Joan of Arc

Cannes, like virtually every other major international film festival showcasing feature-length filmmaking, is largely devoted to cinema that participates in a primarily theatrical mode — dialogue- and performance-driven works that feature subjects with whom we are meant to empathize to some degree. This is an expectation, fused into the medium’s DNA when it was still young, that is embedded in the layout of the festival itself; it’s the world’s largest film market (and therefore tilts mainstream, toward things that can make money), and the prizes it offers — honouring exemplary screenwriting and thespian turns rather than, for example, montage, photography, or sound design — privilege those films that follow along this institutional line. Far outside these understood benchmarkers of quality,…  Read more

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“People Can Choose to Create the Collective, Social Experience”: Billy Woodberry on Bless Their Little Hearts

Nate Hardman in Bless Their Little Hearts

Billy Woodberry was a graduate student in UCLA’s film program when he started work on Bless Their Little Hearts (1984), a gauzy black-and-white portrait of a married couple in Watts as their responsibilities to one another are tested by the burdens of underemployment. Day-to-day gigging against a background of vanishing local industry, Charlie Banks (Nate Hardman) embarks on an affair, while his exhausted wife Andais (Kaycee Hardman) works double-time, commuting to her own job while also looking after their home and children. Chafing against the confines of roles that no longer seem to fit, their affections are suffocated by limits of both resource and opportunity: in one scene, Andais secretly gives Charlie money from her own wallet to give to…  Read more

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The Accidental Tourist, Seven Days in May, Tough Guys, The Paradine Case: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video Picks

The Accidental Tourist

One of the best American films of the 1980s, Lawrence Kasdan’s achingly beautiful and delicate The Accidental Tourist is now available on Blu-ray courtesy of the Warner Archive label. Adapted from a novel by Anne Tyler, The Accidental Tourist tells the story of Macon Leary (William Hurt in one of the great screen performances in history), a travel guide writer whose entire life is geared toward circumventing experience rather than embracing it; his books are for business travelers who want to avoid feeling as if they’ve ever left home. Macon’s insular nature is exacerbated by the tragic death of his son, which hollows him out and destroys his marriage to Sarah (a superb Kathleen Turner, reuniting with her Body Heat collaborators…  Read more

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Sam Kuhn’s Cannes Diary, Part 4: The Fatigue Edition

Director, screenwriter and boatbuilder (!) Sam Kuhn is in Cannes premiering his short film, Möbius — described as “a moth-eaten tale of magic and mutation half remembered by a teen poet who’s beloved lies lifeless in a stream” — in Critic’s Week. Filmmaker asked Kuhn, who hails from the Pacific Northwest, to keep a diary of his experiences, which rapidly went from jet-lagged to deeply strange. Here is his fourth entry; click here for them all. Day 6 Woke up late on account of having actually slept. I bailed on the morning Kawase screening, which is a major faux pas here. If you have a physical ticket and don’t show, they demerit your badge and can demote your “status” on…  Read more

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Filmmaking

NAB 2017: The Interesting Stuff

Last week was the annual NAB show. Every year in April the film and television community comes together in Las Vegas to “ooh” and “ah” over the latest technology. With so much announced and demonstrated, here are the most interesting things I heard about: Blackmagic DaVinci…  Read more

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May 1, 2017

Festivals & Events

Jung Jinyoung and Isabelle Huppert in Claire's Camera

Cannes Dispatch #2: Faces Places, Claire’s Camera, The Square

At some point the past year, Rive Gauche icon Agnès Varda and French photographer JR went on a road trip through rural France documenting whatever locals they encountered and, lucky for us, decided to make a movie about it. The main activity of their excursion…  Read more

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on May 22, 2017

VOD Picks

  • Raw Horror
    Focus Features
    Official site
    5/23/17 MOD VOD
  • La La Land Drama Musical Romance
    Lionsgate
    Official site
    4/25/17 MOD VOD

@FilmmakerMag

  • Wow. “The Square” wins Palme d’Or. Pretty surprised.
  • RT @Screendaily: Nicole sends video acceptance for 70th anniversary prize: "I'm sad that I'm not there. It is what it is, I'm here with my…
  • 120 BPM wins the Grand Prix… 2nd prize. And as someone who has a favorite for the Palme, it’s suddenly gotten very interesting.
  • Huh. Sofia Coppola wins Best Director for “The Beguiled.”
  • That’s two for Lynn Ramsay’s film: screenplay and Joaquin Phoenix for Best Actor.
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