Featured

“It’s a Pretty Unambiguous Condemnation of a New Age Answer to Life’s Problems”: Writer/Director Todd Haynes on Safe

Safe

With Todd Haynes's classic Safe now streaming on Criterion Channel (and seeming utterly prescient in its concerns), we're reposting our Summer, 1995 cover story: Larry Gross's interview with Haynes. -- Editor Todd Haynes, director of Sundance Grand Prize Winner Poison and the underground classic Superstar, was inspired to make his latest feature, Safe, by his visceral response to New Age recovery therapists who tell the physically ill that they have made themselves sick, that they are responsible for their own suffering. Carol White, played superbly by Julianne Moore, is an archetypally banal homemaker in the San Fernando Valley who one day gets sick and never gets well. Her doom is first her own unique physical condition. But her "action" is to be…  Read more

By

DAFilms, DocAlliance’s Streaming Service for Seven European Nonfiction Festivals, Launches in the US

A Campaign of Their Own

DAFilms is a VOD platform run by the DocAlliance, which (per their press release) is "a creative partnership between seven of the major European documentary festivals." Those seven are CPH:DOX, Doclisboa, Millennium Docs Against Gravity FF, DOK Leipzig, FIDMarseille, Ji.hlava IDFF and Visions du Réel. As of March 30, America-based streamers can start streaming for the site for $6.99/month (or $4.99/month with an annual subscription, with individual rental fees for certain titles). While the exact catalogue has yet to be determined, the plan is to showcase some of the best titles from these festivals, both old and new, with future collaborations with American festivals to be determined. Already available to browse: a good amount of Agnès Varda's filmography, a selection of…  Read more

By

Quarantine Reading: I Am My Own Woman and Never, Ever Ever, Coming Down

Iván Monalisa Ojeda in The Voyage of Monalisa

As a publication about film, we find ourselves in the peculiar position of publishing during a moment when theatrical access to movies, and their ongoing future, is as much in question as everything else. During this suspension of normal filmwatching habits, we've reached out to contributors, filmmakers and friends, inviting them to find an alternate path to the movies by participating in a writing exercise engaging with any book about or lightly intersecting with film, in whatever way makes sense to them. Today: Jessica Dunn Rovinelli on two trans autobiographical books turned into doc films. — Vadim Rizov Every book-to-film adaptation requires new aesthetic frameworks to address questions of emphasis and the new relationship between the viewer and text/image. With documentary…  Read more

By

Canon Reformation (1): Yi Yi, Ghost World

The view from the apartment balcony in Yi Yi

I'll keep the establishing premise brief: all articles on every platform are coronavirus-predicated for the unforeseeable future, so no need to belabor that prompt. I almost never watch movies at home: with a tiny attention span, I need the screen to be bigger than me and erase peripheral vision—and in NYC, until very recently, I had the unbelievable luxury of a plethora of big-screen rep viewing to choose from. Now I'm bunkered in a roommate-emptied apartment, pursuing my chosen viewing path for maximal self-soothing distraction: rewatching a personal canon of (mostly) obvious titles I haven't seen in ten to 20 years which imprinted over a formative stretch. Yi Yi premiered at Cannes in 2000, started its platformed US release that October, arrived…  Read more

By

Quarantine Reading: Michel Faber’s The Book Of Strange New Things and Undying: A Love Story

Scarlett Johansson in Under the Skin (Photo courtesy of A24)

As a publication about film, we find ourselves in the peculiar position of publishing during a moment when theatrical access to movies, and their ongoing future, is as much in question as everything else. During this suspension of normal filmwatching habits, we've reached out to contributors, filmmakers and friends, inviting them to find an alternate path to the movies by participating in a writing exercise engaging with any book about or lightly intersecting with film, in whatever way makes sense to them. First up: filmmaker Audrey Ewell (Until the Light Takes Us, 99% — The Occupy Wall Street Collaborative Film, Memory Box) on two works by Michel Faber. -- Vadim Rizov In Michel Faber’s The Book of Strange New Things, a…  Read more

By

Back to One, Episode 105: Hannah Marks

Mega-talented multi-hyphenate Hannah Marks started writing Banana Split when she was still a teenager. It was loosely based on her real life. She rewrote it with her writing partner Joey Power as her acting credits piled up in stuff like The Runaways, The Amazing Spider-Man, and Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency. Then, after she co-directed her first feature (with Power), After Everything, she was able to get Banana Split made with herself in the staring role, directed by Benjamin Kasulke. In this half hour, she talks about the ups and downs of standing her ground and seeing the dream of making this hilarious and smart teen comedy come true, what directing has taught her about acting, why she refuses to…  Read more

By

Kaleidoscope and the Museum of Other Realities Step In to Help the VR Industry During the Pandemic

Danny Bittman's Night Snow at the Museum of Other Realities

One thing that's been uplifting to observe throughout all the recent closures of movie theaters, festivals, and other cultural institutions has been how individuals and companies have stepped in to provide relief, support, and camaraderie during an unprecedented crisis. This is true in the virtual and augmented reality community as much as in the broader film industry, as content creators and distributors have come together to support each other as their work has come to an essential standstill. Of course, some companies and services have seen an uptick in their business, as consumers explore using VR products to hold meetings, even in gaming platforms like Rec Room that weren't intended as business solutions. Likewise, the social music platform WaveXR and the…  Read more

By

 

Subscribe To Filmmaker
© 2020 Filmmaker Magazine
All Rights Reserved
A Publication of IPF